Around the World: France

Grab your favorite beret and silk scarf because we’re traveling to the city of love—Paris, France! Today’s artwork is so enchanting that it will have you dancing though the Parisian streets like Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron.

Though today’s artistic tradition did not necessarily originate in France, one of the most iconic pieces of this tradition can be seen in a very famous Parisian cathedral—let’s take a stroll past the Notre Dame de Paris, shall we?

Notre Dame

In addition to its stunning architecture, the Notre Dame Cathedral is famous for its ornate stained glass, which is where we drew our inspiration. Though the Notre Dame was constructed roughly between the 12th and 13th centuries, the practice of creating stained glass began popping up across Europe as early as the 7th century and as far away as the Middle East.

Notre Dame North Rose

In light of this ancient art form, we asked one of our artists to create something inspired by stained glass. With the help of our Cricut® Artbooking Collection, she created this page:

Stained Glass page

We simply adore this modern spin on traditional Gothic stained glass! The pattern creates a captivating backdrop for the photograph and conveys the sacredness the artist feels toward nature and her family relationships. But our artist didn’t stop with just a page! She also created this beautiful stained glass card:

Stained Glass card

She used watercolor pencils to create the ombré coloring that is reminiscent of stained glass art, and then topped that with clear embossing to give the artwork a glasslike luster. What a beautiful way to share your deepest sympathies with someone you love!

As psychiatrist and author Elisabeth Kübler-Ross said, “People are like stained glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light from within.”

This card would certainly be a beautiful light to someone experiencing heartache or hardships, as it would inspire them to keep shining through life’s darkest moments.

Notre Dame Stained Glass

As you travel through life’s journey, always remember that you have your own individual light within you. Just like a beautiful stained glass window, you will find that some of your most beautiful colors shine through when you rely on your inner light in life’s dark moments. It is this same inner light that will imbue your artwork with your own special touch, spark a light in others, and bring them through the darkness.

So, let yourself shine! Somebody out there needs your light.

P.S. Remember to leave a comment on this post to enter the travel stamp giveaway!

Recipes:

12″ x 12″ Great Adventure Page
C1611 My Acrylix® Campfire Lifestyle, 1385 White Daisy Cardstock, X5930 Slate Cardstock, X5929 Whisper Cardstock, X5762 Lagoon Cardstock, X5764 Pear Cardstock, X5763 Smoothie Cardstock, X5772 Canary Cardstock, Z2173 Slate Exclusive Inks™ Pad, Z2195 Lagoon Exclusive Inks™ Pad, Z2197 Pear Exclusive Inks™ Pad, Z2135 New England Ivy Exclusive Inks™ Pad, Z2013 Sequins Silver Assortment, Z1979 Marvy® Unchida® LePen™ Journaling Pen, Z3171 Cricut® Art Philosophy Collection, Z3169 Cricut® Artbooking Collection

Cricut® Shapes:
Art Philosophy
1 ¼” <Circle1> (p. 21)

Artbooking
10 ½” Overlay <HeloWrld>(p. 84)

5 ½” x 4 ¼” Thinking of You Card
D1651 My Acrylix® Wavy Blooms, 1385 White Daisy Cardstock, 1386 Black Cardstock, 1388 Colonial White Cardstock, Z2503 Basics Exclusive Inks™ Mini Pigment Pads Set, Z891 Versamark™ Ink Pad, 3505 Watercolor Pencils, Z1979 Marvy® Uchida® LePen™ Journaling Pen, Z1754 Sparkles Black & Grey Assortment, Z2088 Ranger™ Clear Super Fine Embossing Powder, Brush
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130 thoughts on “Around the World: France

  1. I loved the Notre Dame Cathedral when I went to Paris & this idea of using the stained glass windows as a scrapbooking & cardmaking feature, while not new to me, is not one that I have explored. I really like the use of the Cricut Artbooking Collection to create a stained glass look on the layout. I will most definitely give this idea a go.

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  2. I wish I could be there to see this beautiful building inside and out. My goodness the beautiful pictures I could get. I’ve never flown before ( been afraid to but would) never had the opportunity too.Maybe I should start a bucket list and try to reach the goals I would love to do… This most defiantly would be on it.. Thank You for sharing.

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  3. I’ve been to Paris and have taken many pictures of Notre Dame. Would love to win the travel stamps to use with my pictures of this site!

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  4. I didn’t comment on the outside of the building. The grayish color looks like CTMH Slate and Whisper paper. What I could build with that!

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  5. Must give both the layout and card ideas a go. France is one place I am definitely visiting with my daughter to see first hand all the places my favourite artists lived and worked.

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  6. Stained glass is beautiful – I have a 4 foot stained glass picture in my dining room window of different birds sitting on a fence with morning glories wrapped around it. It makes me smile everyday. What a colorful & perfect effect to use in a scrapbook layout! Can’t wait to try it!

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  7. Great interpretation of stained glass. I love both the layout and card. I never thought to use clear embossing powder with watercolor pencils. I have added that to my list of things to try.

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  8. The windows stunned me when I was there, but I was also blown away from all the carvings in each entryway, which the outside photos on this post show. I wonder how that could be put on a scrapbook page?

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