Color Theory: Complementary Colors and How to Use Them

Colors are important in making our artwork look good. But, how can you know if your color choices will work well together? When in doubt, you can rely on the basics of color theory to always make good color decisions.

Complementary Colors #ctmh #closetomyheart #complementary #color #colour #theory #scheme #diy #card #scrapbooking #colorfamily #colourfamily #family
This is the Close To My Heart color wheel, made up of all of our exclusive colors.

(Download your printable CTMH color wheel here.)

Complementary colors are two colors opposite each other on the color wheel, such as Cranberry and Willow (red and green), and Goldrush and Pacifica (orange and blue). If you notice, one side of the color wheel is made up of warm colors while the other is made up of cool colors. Complementary colors, since they are across from one another, will have one of each. They create a vibrant contrast, making each other pop without being jarring to the eye.

Complementary Colors #ctmh #closetomyheart #complementary #color #colour #theory #scheme #diy #card #scrapbooking #colorfamily #colourfamily #family

When you’re creating your art, in this case a scrapbook page, avoid using the two colors equally. To keep your artwork interesting, try using one of the colors primarily as a background and the other for accents.

Complementary Colors #ctmh #closetomyheart #complementary #color #theory #diy #card #scrapbooking
You can create something beautiful using one set of complementary colors. Like in this card and the page above, simply incorporating different hues of the same color (or color family) will give your art the visual interest we all seek.

Knowing how to properly use color will only enhance your artwork. Look for a new Color Theory post every month where we will share basic color concepts and artwork inspiration to help you make flawless color decisions that will elevate your artwork.


Recipes

12″ x 12″ Wonderful Page
D1757 My Acrylix® Stargazer—Scrapbooking Stamp Set, X7229B Stargazer Paper Packet, X7228B Gimme Some Sugar Paper Packet, X7230B Chelsea Gardens Paper Packet, 1385 White Daisy Cardstock, X5962 Goldrush Cardstock, Z3367 Vellum Paper, Z2833 Pebble Exclusive Inks™ Stamp Pad, X7229C Stargazer Complements, Z4143 Stargazer Dots, Z3169 Cricut® Artbooking Collection

Cricut® Shapes:
Artbooking
1¼”, 1½” Shift + Border <L> (p. 66, M46848)

4¼” x 5½” The World Is Yours to Explore Card (Horizontal)
B1565 My Acrylix® A New Adventure Stamp Set, X7227B Make Waves Paper Packet, X7228B Gimme Some Sugar Paper Packet, 1385 White Daisy Cardstock, X5982 Canary Cardstock, Z2831 Charcoal Exclusive Inks™ Stamp PadX7229C Stargazer Complements, Z3364 Basics Ribbon Pack, Z1263 Bitty Sparkles, Z3274 Clear Sparkles, Z3169 Cricut® Artbooking Collection

Cricut® Shape:
Artbooking
2½” Shift + Border <TeamWork> (p. 83., M46F65)

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Coloring Time!

Have you ever wondered how to create our exclusive colors with the ShinHan™ Touch Twin™ markers? Well wonder no more, because we’re about to show you how!

After some experimentation, one of our amazing artists has identified winning marker combinations that faithfully replicate the colors in our exclusive color palette. We’ve used her findings to create this marker chart that shows which marker colors to mix to create our exclusive colors.

Marker ChartPretty neat, right? Now just imagine how nicely your coloring is going to coordinate with our cardstock, Fundamentals, and B&T Duos™ in your artwork! Okay, okay, let’s dive into the details of how we created this chart so you can do it at home. Here are instructions for filling out your own marker chart:

  1. Print off the marker chart. (Use this version if you prefer “colour” to “color” 🙂 )
  2. Using our 1″ Circle Punch, punch out a circle for each color of cardstock on the chart. Attach these circles to the chart.
  3. On White Daisy cardstock, shade an area with the first marker color listed for a particular circle. Use the large tip of the marker. Then, with the ink still wet on the cardstock, shade the area with the second marker color.
  4. Some of the colors also require shading with the blender marker, additional markers, or multiple applications of specific colors. Just be sure that the ink from the previous application is still wet when applying your next color.
  5. Use our 1″ Circle Punch to punch out a circle from your marker shading, and attach it to the right of the corresponding cardstock circle.
  6. Complete steps 3 through 5 for all colors on the chart.
  7. Hang the chart in your crafting space for future reference.
  8. Do your happy dance!

Marker Chart How To

As you create this marker chart, here are a few important things to know:

  • The order in which you layer the marker colors is VERY important. Start with the first marker color, and then add the second marker color on top of the wet ink for the best results.
  • The color of the paper will affect the marker color combinations. We tested our color combinations on White Daisy cardstock.
  • Results may vary with how hard or light you press on the marker.
  • Blending markers can create a streaky texture. We love this because it makes the artwork look handmade rather than printed, so embrace the unique textures you create!

Tonight, grab your favorite beverage, some chocolate, and your printed marker chart—then slip away to your crafting space for an hour or so. It’s time to treat yourself to some well-deserved crafting time, and creating this marker chart is the perfect activity to wind down after a long day. Enjoy!

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