New Spins on Old Techniques

Like the world of fashion, trends in papercrafting are always changing. One day it’s all about brads and buttons and the next it’s all about sparkles and shimmer!

Just because an artistic technique or aesthetic may no longer be “on trend” doesn’t mean that you can’t still use it. You just need to freshen it up!

To show you what we mean, we dug through our archives to find artwork created with some old-school techniques. We then asked our artists to create new artwork using these same techniques…with a modern-day spin!

They’ve come up with some amazing alterations to these techniques that will make your artwork amazing!

Old Technique:

Distressing the edges of your titles with ink. Remember when we did this for everything? Distress all the things! 🙂

New spins on old papercrafting techniques #ctmh #closetomyheart #learn #technique #scrapbooking #papercrafting

New Spin:

Instead of distressing your titles, try stamping them using the rock n’ roll technique. It keeps your edges clean, which is the new trend, but just like distressing, it gives your titles dimension and color variation.

New spins on old papercrafting techniques #ctmh #closetomyheart #learn #technique #scrapbooking #papercrafting

Old Technique:

Ripping and inking your edges, aka, making your artwork look like it’s 100 years old. And remember how burned edges were such a thing? Ripping and inking your edges with black ink mimicked that trend, which you can see on the card below.

New spins on old papercrafting techniques #ctmh #closetomyheart #learn #technique #scrapbooking #papercrafting

New Spin:

Instead of inking your ripped edges, try leaving your ripped edges un-inked and inking your clean edges instead, using a color other than black or brown! The key is subtlety! You can see we added some faint pink inking to the edges of the pink paper here. It helps to add some depth to the paper without screaming “I’m distressed!”

New spins on old papercrafting techniques #ctmh #closetomyheart #learn #technique #scrapbooking #papercrafting

Old Technique:

Stippled titles. Remember this one? You’d spell out your title with stickers, make a million little dots over the stickers with a marker, and then peel off your stickers to reveal your finished title.

New spins on old papercrafting techniques #ctmh #closetomyheart #learn #technique #scrapbooking #papercrafting

New Spin:

Watercolored titles. Instead of stippling over your stickers with a marker, paint over them with a wide paintbrush and some watercolor paint. We used this technique with a “hello” sticker from our Springtime Complements to create the title below.

New spins on old papercrafting techniques #ctmh #closetomyheart #learn #technique #scrapbooking #papercrafting

Pretty neat, right?

Just because papercrafting trends change doesn’t mean you need to throw out your bag of tricks. All you need to do is find a way to make your old tricks feel new again!

Which spin is your favorite? Tell us in the comments below!


Recipes

4 ¼” x 5 ½” Welcome Baby Card (Horizontal)
C1668 My Acrylix® Baby Bundle Stamp Set, X7219B Little Dreamer Paper Packet, 1385 White Daisy Cardstock, 1292 Crystal Blue Cardstock, Z2841 Glacier Exclusive Inks™ Stamp Pad, Z2895 Lagoon Exclusive Inks™ Stamp Pad, Z3189 White & Gold Ribbon, Z3247 Simple Chevron Embossing Folder, Z3285 Cricut® Flower Market Collection, Embossing Machine

Cricut® Shapes:
Flower Market
1″ Shift+Title <?> (p. 8)
1 ½” Shift_Title <R> (cut 4, p. 14)
 

4 ¼” x 5 ½” Happy Birthday Card (Vertical)
B1537 My Acrylix® Birthday Sparkles Stamp Set, X7219B Little Dreamer Paper Packet, 1385 White Daisy Cardstock, Z2840 Thistle Exclusive Inks™ Stamp Pad, Z2896 Smoothie Exclusive Inks™ Stamp Pad, Z3189 White & Gold Ribbon, Z3312 Gold Glitter Gems, Z3285 Cricut® Flower Market Collection

Cricut® Shape:
Flower Market
2 ¼” Flower-2 <7> (p. 7)
 

12″ x 12″ Hello Page
CC1219 Swirly Seashells Stamp + Thin Cuts, x7221B Prickly Pear Paper Packet, Z3254 Enchantment Fundamentals Paper Packet, 1385 White Daisy Cardstock, Z3146 Watercolor PaperZ3271 Archival Black Exclusive Inks™ Stamp Pad, Z3307 Springtime ComplementsZ3216 White Twine, Z3089 Grey Enamel Gems, Z3132 Watercolor Paints, Z3188 Paintbrush Set, 3505 Watercolor Pencils, Z3285 Cricut® Flower Market Collection, Pen

Cricut® Shape:
Flower Market
2 ½” Flower-2 <7> (p. 7)

 
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From Jeanette: My First Scrapbook

There is a certain scrapbook on my shelf that stands apart from all the others. I’m sure you feel the same way about one or two of yours. It’s the one that holds so much of your heart that you rank it among your most prized possessions. Perhaps it holds the last photo taken of your mother or father, or maybe it’s the one that tells the story of your first few years with your children. For me, this scrapbook is special because it’s the first one I ever made. In honor of National Scrapbooking Day coming up this Saturday, I want to share with you the scrapbook that began my lifetime of memory keeping. Have a look! I’ve created so many scrapbooks through the years, but this is the one that started it all.

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

This book is heavy with memories. The photos, journaling, and doodles that live in this collection came straight from the heart of my 15-, 16-, and then 17-year-old self. This album is a flashback to high school! (It’s been awhile since you gave any thought to the 70s, hasn’t it?)

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

I started scrapbooking as a teenager, first, because I wanted to preserve the memories of some of the best times of my life. I also had a creative flair, and doodling, coloring, and lettering became an artistic outlet for me. Within the pages of this book, I could save not only pictures, but also the stories that went with them. I loved scrapbooking dearly when I was 17, but, my, how my love for it has grown! I had no idea then how what was once only a hobby would expand into my life’s work.

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Even as a high school student, creativity was important to me. Being creative is not limited to the artists or the musicians—it’s something anyone can enjoy!

And preserving memories can and should be done by everyone. Look at the treasures I can enjoy now because I put a little thought then into remembering. Of course, this scrapbook was made long before archival-quality products existed. Just a few dime store markers were enough to portray the messages I wanted to live on through this book.

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

I created visual patterns and designs with simple hand drawings using those trusty markers, a little glitter, and a lot of white glue. The result was the forerunner to Background & Texture (B&T) paper!

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Artwork from Jeanette's first scrapbook

Creating a “great” page of memories doesn’t require the cutest products or the most trained hand; it only takes a desire to share your story and a love for the message you want to share. This book is important to me because it’s filled with pieces of my past. This is my story, told the way I experienced it. Is that how you think of your scrapbooks? Do you gain a deep satisfaction and joy from recording your life according to you?

With National Scrapbooking Month just a day away, commit to making pages that are filled with more than simply highlights of a few fun days. Use them to bring to life the people and relationships that mean the most to you, because that’s what memory keeping is all about. And then, years down the road, you, too, can look back and feel as thankful as I do now.

Love,

Jeanette

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Grandma’s Old-Fashioned Dry Dressing

Looking for a new dish to add to your Christmas feast? How about something time-tested? The recipe we’re about to share is definitely that (a hundred years, at least), but you can be sure nothing about it has gone out of style. It’s an oldie, but the Close To My Heart employee who shared it guarantees that her great grandmother’s recipe has yet to disappoint.

Cooks young and old, we bring to you Grandma’s Old-Fashioned Dry Dressing! Savory and crumbly in the most delicious way, this dish will have everyone coming back for more. Good thing it’s so easy to make!

Dry dressing

Adjust the following ingredients to meet your family’s needs, but don’t skimp on your favorites. 🙂

1. Two days before your feast, spread out slices of 1 loaf white bread on baking sheets to dry in the open air.   2. When you’re ready to prepare your meal, break bread slices into bite-sized pieces. (They don’t have to be completely dry to still be delicious!) Place them in a 3-quart baking dish.   3. Chop an onion into bite-sized pieces and mix in with bread.   4. Sprinkle rubbed sage into mixture to taste.   5. Melt a cube of butter and drizzle over mixture. (It’s up to you how much butter you use, but keep in mind that the butter will help cook your onions and lends a lot of flavor to your dressing.)   6. Cover dish and bake at 350° for approximately 45 minutes to thoroughly cook your onions and to produce a steaming final product. If you prefer crunchy onions, remove dish from oven sooner. *Note: Shallower dishes will require less baking time.

If you have extra stuffing mixture that won’t fit in your baking dish, store it in the fridge and bake it to eat with your other leftovers the next day. There aren’t usually leftovers of this dish once the feast is over, so you’ll be glad to have such a treat.

We hope you enjoy this old-fashioned addition to your feast. Happy Holidays!

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